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Interaction Lab

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MegaManSTAND Established in Fall 2012, The Department of Communication Studies’ Interaction Lab (210D, 210E and 210F Armstrong Hall) features an observation room and data chamber that provide the faculty and graduate students of our department a secure and robust environment to collect data for their research. The space is designed to accommodate research on media uses and effects as well as interpersonal communication and relational dynamics research.


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#ixlab Google+ Page

#ixlab Notes

Our research team maintains an active research and theory blog where we release drafts of research reports and discuss other media- and technology-related issues.

#ixlab Notes blog

Observation Room
(210D Armstrong Hall)

The observation room is our primary area for data collection. It is designed to accommodate two media users in a comfortable environment, and can be rearranged to focus on dyadic interactions.

  • High-end electronics, including a 46-inch 3D-capable television, Blu-Ray player and other computing and gaming equipment
  • Sony Tablet S for electronic data collection and storage, as well as individualized stimulus presentation and control
  • Research licenses for MediaLab v2012 and DirectRT
  • NeuroSky electroencephalography (EEG) brainwave analytical tools, for studying attention and focus during media interactions.
  • One-way mirror for unobtrusive behavioral coding
  • Closed-circuit audio and video recording equipment
  • Attractive, comfortable furnishings to provide a more naturalistic environment for research

Data Chamber
(210E Armstrong Hall)

The data chamber is the primary workstation for the Interaction lab. Each workstation is equipped with SPSS 19.0 and the Microsoft Office suite, as well as other proprietary research programs. There is also a one-way mirror for discrete observation of research activity in 210D (the observation room).

  • Three privacy workstations for data entry and content analysis
  • Three licenses for MediaLab v2012
  • Removable privacy shields for collaborative computing work
  • One production workstation with Adobe Creative Suite 5 for creating printed and multimedia study materials
  • Virtual and physical data storage space

Meeting Room
(210F Armstrong Hall)

For Fall 2014, a new production lab has been installed in 210F that includes iMovie and other Apple-based programs, as well as participant-researcher meeting spaces.

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For more information on the Interaction Lab, please contact Dr. Nick Bowman.

Recent presentations and publications

Publications

  • Banks, J. (in press). Object-relation mapping: A method for analyzing phenomenal assemblages of play. Journal of Gaming and Virtual Worlds.
  • Banks, J. & Bowman, N. D. (in press). Avatars are (sometimes) people too: Linguistic indicators of parasocial and social features in player-avatar relationships. Manuscript forthcoming in New Media & Society.
  • Cohen, E. L. (in press). Enjoyment of a counter-hedonic serious digital game: Determinants
    and effects on learning and self-efficacy. Psychology of Popular Media Culture.
  • Cohen, E. L., & Lancaster, A. L. (2014). Individual differences in connected viewing: The
    role of emotional contagion, need for belonging, and coviewing orientation in mediated and non-mediated coviewing. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 17, 512-518.
  • Cohen, E.L. (2014). What makes good games go viral? The role of technology use, efficacy, emotion and enjoyment in players’ decision to share a prosocial digital game. Computers in Human Behavior, 33, 321-329.
  • Bowman, N. D. (2013). Social media, spaghetti westerns, and modern spectator sports. In Coombs, D. & Batchelor, B. (Eds.), American History through American Sports (Vol. 3). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.
  • Bowman, N. D., & Tamborini, R (2013). “In the mood to game”: Selective exposure and mood management processes in computer game play. New Media & Society. doi: 10.1177/1461444813504274
  • Limperos, A., Downs, E., Ivory, J., & Bowman, N. D. (2013). Leveling up: A review of current and emerging areas of interest in video games and future research directions. Communication Yearbook 37, 349-377.
  • Tamborini, R., Weber, R., Bowman, N. D., Eden, A., & Skalski, P. (2013). “Violence is a many-splintered thing:” The importance of realism, justification, and graphicness in understanding perceptions of and preferences for violent films and video games. Projections: The Journal for Movies and Mind,7 (1), 100-118. doi: 10.3167/proj.2013.070108 [link]

Presentations

2014

  • Banks, J. (2014, November). Multimodal, multiplex, multispatial: A network model of the Self. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL. Top paper, Communication and the Future Division.
  • Bowman, N.D., Kowert, R., & Cohen, E.L. (2014, November) When the ball stops, the fun stops too: The impact of social inclusion on video game enjoyment. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.
  • Cohen, E.L., Bowman, N.D., & Borchert, K. (2014, November). Private flirts, public friends:
    Understanding romantic jealousy responses to an ambiguous social network site message as a function of message access exclusivity. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Chicago.
  • Rogers, R., Bowman, N.D., & Oliver, M. B. (2014, November). It’s not the model that doesn’t fit, it’s the controller! The role of cognitive skills in understanding the links between natural mapping, performance, and enjoyment of console video games. Paper to be presented at the National Communication Association, Chicago.
  • Banks, J., & Bowman, N.D. (2014, October). The win, the worth, and the work of play: Exploring phenomenal entertainment values in online gaming experiences. Paper presented at Meaningful Play, East Lansing, MI.
  • Cohen, E. L. (2014, August). Parasocial 2.0: Exploring parasocial interaction in new media
    environments. Presentation given at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C.
  • Borchert, K., Cohen, E., & Bowman, N. D. (2014, April). Relationship Threatening Interpretations of an Ambiguous Facebook Message as a Function of Message Exclusivity and Dimensions of Jealousy. Paper presented at the annual meeting of Eastern Communication Association, Providence, Rhode Island.
  • Cohen, E. L., & Tyler, W. J. (2014, May). Examining perceived distance and authenticity as mediators of the effects of sociability and ghost-tweeting on parasocial interaction with a microcelebrity. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Seattle.
  • Dogruel, L. D., Joeckel, S., & Bowman, N. D. (2014, May). “There’s (a lot of) apps for that!”: An exploratory perspective on media choice processes for smartphone apps. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Seattle.

2013

  • Cohen, E., Lancaster, A., & Bowman, N. D. (2013, November). Are u With Some1? Using Text Message Experience Sampling to Examine the Relationship Between Co-Viewing, Enjoyment, and Eudaimonia. Top four papers in Mass Communication, National Communication Association, Washington D.C.
  • Lancaster, A. L., & Cohen, E. L. (2013, November). Individuals’ expectancies for television co-viewing: The role of relationship type, time-shifting devices, motives for television use, and co-viewing orientation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Washington, D.C.
  • Bowman, N. D., Rogers, R., Sherrick, B. I., & Woolley, J. (2013, April). “In control or in their shoes”: How character attachment differentially influences video game enjoyment and appreciation. Top paper in “Media and the Self” research category, Broadcast Education Association Research Symposium “Media and Social Life: The Self, Relationships, and Society.”
  • Cohen, E., & Lancaster, A. L. (2013, April). Individual Differences in Connected Viewing: The Role of Emotional Contagion, Need for Belonging, and Coviewing Orientation in Mediated and Non-Mediated Coviewing. Paper presented at Broadcast Education Association Research Symposium “Media and Social Life: The Self, Relationships, and Society.”
  • Goldman, Z. D., Bowman, N. D., & Westerman, D. K. (2013, April). “You Need to Back Off”: Utilizing Communication Privacy Management Theory to Explore Responses to Public and Private Negative Interpersonal Disclosures on Facebook. Paper presented at Broadcast Education Association Research Symposium “Media and Social Life: The Self, Relationships, and Society.”
  • Cranmer, G., Bowman, N. D., Chory, R., & Weber. K. (2013, April). Color-Blind: Race as an Antecedent Condition in Brawn and Brain Framing of Heisman Finalists in Newspaper Coverage. Paper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Communication Association, Pittsburgh.
  • Goldman, Z., Westerman, D., Bowman, N. D., & Cranmer, G. (2013, April). Communication Privacy Management Theory and Message Perception: Exploring the Role of Public and Private Spheres on Facebook. Paper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Communication Association, Pittsburgh.
  • Cohen, E. L. (April, 2013). Enjoyment of a Counter-Hedonic Serious Digital Game: Determinants and Effects on Learning and Self-Efficacy. Paper to be presented the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Communication Association, Pittsburgh.
  • Cohen, E. L. (June, 2013). Exploring Subtext Processing in Narrative Persuasion: The Role of Eudaimonic Entertainment Use Motivation and a Supplemental Conclusion Scene. Paper to be presented the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association, London.
  • Cranmer, G., Bowman, N. D., & Goldman, Z. (2013, June). “Big run, or smart Gun”: How racially-based sports frames influence subsequent audience behaviors and attitudes of audiences towards athletes. Paper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association, London.

MIL in the News

  • Dr. Bowman was interviewed by BBC World Service for his research on the perceptions and attraction of media violence as part of a on-going radio series, “The Why Factor?
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Seelio: Sharing Student Work

Students enrolled in COMM courses are asked to study the theory and process of human communication so that they can apply this knowledge to understanding real-world issues. As part of this process, COMM students have adopted the Seelio platform – a social media platform that allows students to create an online portfolio of their coursework that is easily accessible to the public. Sharing these portfolios shows the importance of the COMM degree while also giving prospective employees a clear, accurate look at the academic work our students are doing.

Seelio Student Coursework Showcase

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Academic Advising

Our advisors are available during the summer, fall and spring semesters during office hours. Check 108 Armstrong Hall, call 304-293-3905, or e-mail an advisor to check office hours for the semester (see below for contact information).

The COMM academic advisors are:

Dr. Andrea Weber – acweber@mail.wvu.edu
Nikki Loy – nikki.loy@mail.wvu.edu
Dr. John Shibley – jshibley@wvu.edu
Mary Donato – mdonato4@mix.wvu.edu

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Request a Mountaineer Intern

Professional Field Experience (PFE) is a key element in the undergraduate COMM curriculum that allows students to gain experience in applying their classroom knowledge to a variety of corporate and organizational environments. Organizations looking for students with an in-depth understanding of communication areas that include (but are not limited to) communication theory, data analysis, health communication, interpersonal communication, organizational communication, and social media/communication technology now have the opportunity to request an intern from the Department of Communication Studies at WVU. Use the form below to read up on our PFE program, and to request a Mountaineer intern today.

Organization Intern Application